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South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101
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All About Gum Disease



Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
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Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
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Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis


Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[pic:Teeth-and-irritated-gums-close-up-gum-disease.jpg|300||right|TPimgRight|Close up of

Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[client:streetcity]]],

Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[client:streetstate]]] patient's periodontitis.]]]The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:

Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[DIVSTYLE:margin-left:25px|

Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[BulletList:Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
;Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
;Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
;Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis. ]]]]]]

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.

Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[DIVSTYLE:margin-left:25px|

Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[BulletList:Your gums appear swollen or are red.
;They are tender to the touch.
;They bleed when you brush your teeth.
;Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
;You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
;You have bad breath that does not go away.
;One or more of your teeth are loose.
;You can see pus around your gum or teeth.]]]]]]

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.

Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[DIVSTYLE:margin-left:25px|

Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[BulletList:Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
;Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
;Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
;Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
;It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.]]]]]]

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at

Have you brushed your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding a little bit? If so, your gums are likely infected. The bacteria on your gums may cause them to weaken or swell up. If you don't do something about this, the bacteria will spread and can eventually start destroying your teeth and the jawbone that supports them. This can lead to your teeth becoming very loose and falling out.

Unfortunately, many people who notice a little bit of blood when they brush their teeth aren't concerned about it. Gum disease is much more prevalent than you might believe. One study done by the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported that 50% of adults over age 30 had noticed their gums bleeding.

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is something we see often. When your gums are inflamed and bleeding, you should never assume it will go away on its own. You have a bacterial infection, and you need to make an appointment to deal with it. However, Gum disease is more than just bleeding gums.

The Three Stages of Gum Disease

Gum disease can be broken down into three stages that increase in severity as they go. Most of the people who see some blood when they brush their teeth are only on the first stage, but if they ignore this issue, it's very likely that they will progress on to the more advanced stages. Here is a little more about these three stages.

Gingivitis

The first stage of gum disease is gingivitis. Many people have heard of gingivitis and believe it's another name for gum disease as a whole, but it's just the mildest stage. Signs of gingivitis include swollen, red gums that easily bleed when touched. You usually won't feel much, if any, pain at this stage. You may notice your gums bleeding, but it doesn't hurt to brush your teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene. If you go without brushing and flossing for a few weeks to a month, you will probably start to notice it. Fortunately, it's completely reversible if you get back to practicing good oral hygiene and visit us for a professional cleaning.

Periodontitis

Close up of South Ogden, UT patient's periodontitis.The second stage of gum disease is periodontitis. If gingivitis isn't treated, the bacteria will eventually spread throughout your mouth and get below the gum line. The bacteria will continue to produce toxins that irritate your gums. These toxins cause a type of chronic inflammation that makes the body believe that its bone and tissues need to be destroyed. They start to break down the jawbone, leaving your teeth without much support.

During this stage, you will notice that the roots of your teeth are exposed as the gums pull away. This leaves space between the gums and the teeth where bacteria collect. These pockets will get larger and deeper as the bone and gums are destroyed. Eventually, your teeth will become loose and may fall out on their own.

You may not notice any pain during periodontitis either, despite how damaging it is to the mouth.

Advanced Periodontitis

The final stage of gum disease is advanced periodontitis. During this stage, your gums continue to be inflamed and pull away even further from the teeth. The roots of your teeth may be fully exposed, and it's likely that you will lose a good amount of bone density. It's very likely that anyone with advanced periodontitis will have to have several teeth removed.

In addition to the standard three stages of gum disease, there are a few other types of periodontitis that you may suffer from:
•  Chronic periodontitis recurs often. The tissue supporting the teeth gets inflamed, and you will experience some bone loss. This type of periodontitis is very common. It usually progresses somewhat slowly, but it can progress more rapidly in some area.
•  Aggressive periodontitis rapidly damages the bone, gums, and teeth. It often occurs in those who are otherwise healthy.
•  Necrotizing periodontal disease occurs when lesions form from necrotized tissue, ligaments, and bone. This form of periodontitis usually occurs in those who are malnourished or have some immune system problem.
•  Periodontitis can also sometimes manifest as a symptom of another disease. This usually occurs while the patient is still young. Chronic conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, or heart disease can be the cause of this type of periodontitis.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Since gum disease is usually painless, it can be hard to tell when something is wrong. If you notice any of the following symptoms, it may be time to call us and make an appointment.
•  Your gums appear swollen or are red.
•  They are tender to the touch.
•  They bleed when you brush your teeth.
•  Your gums have pulled away from your teeth.
•  You notice a bad taste in your mouth that will not go away.
•  You have bad breath that does not go away.
•  One or more of your teeth are loose.
•  You can see pus around your gum or teeth.

What causes gum disease?

At the root of gum disease is bacteria. When dental plaque begins building up on the teeth, the bacteria in this plaque cause the body to react. The immune system recognizes these bacteria as invaders and releases white blood cells. These cells cause the gums to swell and may damage the jawbone and the periodontal ligament while trying to get rid of the plaque. The result is gingivitis, which, if not treated, can quickly worsen.

If plaque is left on your teeth for too long, it will start to harden. This process, also called calcification, turns the plaque into calculus or tartar. More plaque can attach itself to this tartar because the outer surface is rougher than that of your teeth. This plaque can then later calcify, and the cycle continues, building layer upon layer onto your teeth. Tartar-control toothpaste can help disrupt this cycle, but it cannot remove any of the tartar that has built up below your gum line. You will need to come in for a deep cleaning for that.

Factors That Can Contribute to Gum Disease

While bacteria causes gum disease, there are some other factors that can contribute to it. These factors may make your gum disease worse or increase your risk of developing it.

Genetics

Studies have linked certain genes with the increased chance of developing gum disease. Individuals with these genes are usually much more prone to infection than others, which means that they need to be much more vigilant with their daily dental hygiene. If they are, they may never develop the disease despite their genetics.

Tobacco Use

People who smoke or use other types of tobacco are also much more likely to develop gum disease or to worsen the disease if it already exists. Smoking can also make the bacteria more resilient, making it harder to successfully treat gum disease. Those who smoke also tend to have more tartar on the teeth and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth. It’s also likely that smokers will lose more density in the jawbone as well.

Crowded or Misaligned Teeth

If your teeth are not aligned correctly, it can make it harder to thoroughly brush each one and to get the floss in between them. This can create hard-to-reach areas where the plaque can form uninterrupted. This can greatly increase your chance of developing gingivitis. If you have crowded or misaligned teeth, we will teach you how to best clean your mouth. In some cases, that may involve using a special toothbrush or other tools. You may also need orthodontics to straighten your teeth.

Incorrect Bridgework or Braces

If your bridge or braces aren't installed properly, it can also make it very difficult to clean around them. We work with all of our patients to make certain that’s not a concern. If you ever have difficulty cleaning your teeth due to your braces or any other dental work, contact us immediately so we can work to resolve the issue.

Grinding or Clenching Your Teeth

While grinding or clenching your teeth may not cause gum disease, it can damage the gums if they are already inflamed. These bad habits also put more stress on your teeth, which can cause the periodontal ligament and the jawbone to break down more quickly. Most of the time, patients aren't even aware that they are doing this. Once they know they are, they are able to recognize the habit when they are doing it and control it. In some cases, we may need to create a mouth guard to help get this bad habit under control.

Hormones

If your hormone levels are spiking or changing rapidly, this can affect many different areas of your body. That's why those going through pregnancy, menopause, and puberty may all be at higher risk of developing gum disease. Once your hormone levels even out, this higher risk also drops off.

Stress

Being stressed also does a lot to the body. It can make your gum disease much worse, and it can make it more difficult to treat. When you are stressed, your immune system gets weaker, so it's harder to battle the infection. You may also clench your jaw and grind your teeth.

Medication Side Effects

There are some medications that can increase your risk of gum disease or make gum disease worse. Any medication that can cause dry mouth may do this. These medications are commonly prescribed for things such as high blood pressure or depression. They reduce the amount of saliva the mouth makes. Saliva is how the mouth cleans itself, and without it, plaque will begin building up on your teeth.

Some medications can also cause your gums to swell, which makes it easier for plaque to get trapped between them and the teeth. These medications include those used for seizures, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and certain medications given to those who have just received an organ transplant.

Poor Diet

If you don't eat right, you are likely to be deficient in several key minerals and vitamins. Without vitamin C, you may develop scurvy, which can cause your gums to bleed. This gives bacteria a way in, leading to infection.

Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Issues

Recent studies have shown stronger and stronger links between gum disease and some other health conditions. While research has strengthened these links, there are still many questions scientists and dentists have. However, while more research is needed, what is clear is that gum disease does have a relationship with the following.
•  Patients who have diabetes may have more difficulty keeping their blood sugar levels under control than patients who do not suffer from gum disease.
•  Those who have gum disease may also be at an increased risk of having a stroke, especially a stroke caused by a blockage in the arteries.
•  Gum disease can also increase the chance of suffering from heart disease and clogged arteries. Gum disease also may cause heart disease to get worse.
•  Pregnant women who have gum disease may go into labor prematurely. They may also have babies with a lower than average birth weight.
•  It is also possible that gum disease can contribute to respiratory disease. That is because the bacteria in the gums may get down into the lungs, causing infection or making current infections worse. This can be especially dangerous for seniors because it can lead to severe pneumonia, which can be deadly.

Treatment

With gum disease, you want to focus on prevention rather than treatment. If you practice good oral hygiene and visit us for regular cleanings and checkups, you are likely never to have to deal with gum disease at all. Just as with any health issue, avoiding it is always preferable to treating it. By brushing and flossing regularly and correctly, you will continually remove the majority of the dental plaque. When you come in for a cleaning, we will perform a deep clean that removes all of the plaque that you may not always be able to get to with floss or toothbrush.

Do you have gum disease?

If you have noticed bleeding around your gums or any of the other signs of gum disease, don't simply ignore it because it doesn't hurt. This serious disease needs to be dealt with as soon as possible, or it can result in tooth loss. Contact us today at South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point
[CLIENT:OfficePhone]]] to make an appointment to begin treating your gum disease before it reaches that point.
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South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101

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Cassity & Legacy Implants and Periodontics, 5331 S. Adams Ave, Suite A, South Ogden, UT 84405 • South Ogden: (385) 626-0977    Kaysville: (385) 439-0101 • cassityimplants.com • 7/25/2021 • Associated Words: dental implants South Ogden UT Kaysville UT • dental implants South Ogden UT Kaysville UT •